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Hicksville Water District
Hicksville Water District

Facilities   arrow

Plants

Water Plant Facilities
Air-Stripping
Backup Generators
Containment Pads


Water Plant Facilities

Hicksville Water’s 15 deep underground wells, 2 elevated water storage tanks and 3 ground level tanks are located at 10 plant sites throughout the district’s 7.9 square mile service area. Great care is taken by qualified professionals to keep the facilities well maintained — both aesthetically and mechanically. Each site is equipped with state-of-the-art infrastructure that is best suited for that particular location. Some of the more modern technology includes include air-stripping, back-up generators and containment pads. Through careful planning and budgeting, the water district’s routine maintenance program is reviewed and implemented on a ongoing basis to ensure that each well location is kept in good working order to provide a continuous flow of water to the public for drinking and fire fighting.


Plant 1 (Bethpage Road)

Site of the district’s first air-stripping facility (constructed 1983). A 155-foot elevated storage tank holds 1.25 million gallons of water.

Well #1- 4 (1965)
Commissioners
Harry Borley, Chairman
William A. Cisler, Treasurer
George A. Kunz, Secretary

Superintendent
Harold F. Hawxhurst

Depth – 545 feet
Daily pumping capacity – 1.086 million gallons

Well #1- 6 (1980)
Commissioners
Stanford Weiss, Chairman
Harry Borley, Treasurer
Gilbert E. Cusick, Secretary

Superintendent
Louis G. Dettloff

Depth of well – 583 feet
Daily pumping capacity – 1.567 million gallons

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Plant 3 (Jerusalem Avenue)

Well #3-2 (1969)
Commissioners
Not in service at this time.
Harry Borley, Chairman
William A. Cisler, Treasurer
George A. Kunz, Secretary

Superintendent
Harold F. Hawxhurst

Depth of well -505 feet

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Plant 4 (Newbridge Road)

A 196-foot elevated storage tank holds 500,000 gallons of water.

Well #4-2 (1969)
Commissioners
William A. Cisler, Chairman
Harry Borley, Treasurer
George A. Kunz, Secretary

Superintendent
Harold F. Hawxhurst

Depth of well – 601 feet
Daily pumping capacity – 774,000 gallons

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Plant 5 (Stewart Avenue)

Ground-level storage tank holds 2 million gallons of water. Air-stripping facility added in 1992.

Well #5-2 (1965)
Commissioners
Harry Borley, Chairman
William A. Cisler, Treasurer
George A. Kunz, Secretary

Superintendent
Harold F. Hawxhurst

Depth of well – 551 feet
Daily pumping capacity – 300,000 gallons

Well #5-3 (1977)
Commissioners
Harry Borley, Chairman
Gilbert E. Cusick, Treasurer
Stanford Weiss, Secretary

Superintendent
Louis G. Dettloff

Depth of well – 610 feet
Daily pumping capacity – 1.024 million gallons

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Plant 6 (Kuhl Avenue)

Well #6-1 (1952)
Commissioners
Charles E. Colthurst, Chairman
William A. Cisler, Treasurer
Harry Borley, Secretary

Superintendent
Fredrick R. Davidson

Depth of well – Originally 419 feet
re-drilled to 615 feet in 2001
Daily pumping capacity -1.6 million gallons

Well #6-2 (1952)
Commissioners
Charles E. Colthurst, Chairman
William A. Cisler, Treasurer
Harry Borley, Secretary

Superintendent
Fredrick R. Davidson

Depth of well – 428 feet
Daily pumping capacity – 498,000 gallons

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Plant 7 (Miller Road)

Well #7-1 (1958)
Commissioners
Not in service at this time.
Harry Borley, Chairman
William A. Cisler, Treasurer
George A. Kunz, Secretary

Superintendent
Frederick R. Davidson

Depth of well – 605 feet

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Plant 8 (Dean Street)

Location of district’s administration offices and vehicle and equipment storage facilities. Air stripping facility constructed in 1990.

Well #8-1 (1958)
Commissioners
Harry Borley, Chairman
William A. Cisler, Treasurer
George A. Kunz, Secretary

Superintendent
Frederick R. Davidson

Depth of well – 632 feet
Daily pumping capacity – 336,000 gallons

Well #8-3 (1977)
Commissioners
Harry Borley, Chairman
Gilbert E. Cusick, Treasurer
Stanford Weiss, Secretary

Superintendent
Louis G. Dettloff

Depth of well – 637 feet
Daily pumping capacity – 578,000 gallons

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Plant 9 (Alicia Street)

Ground storage tank holds 2 million gallons of water.

Well #9-1 (1971)
Commissioners
William A. Cisler, Chairman
Harry Borley, Treasurer
W. Arnold Jeanson, Secretary

Superintendent
Harold F. Hawxhurst

Depth of well – 590 feet
Daily pumping capacity – 1.072 million gallons
Note: Rehabilitated in 1999 under leadership of Commissioners Nicholas J. Brigandi, Gilbert E. Cusick and Richard A. Humann and Superintendent William E. Schuckmann.

Well #9-2 (1971)
Commissioners
William A. Cisler, Chairman
Harry Borley, Treasurer
W. Arnold Jeanson, Secretary
Superintendent
Harold F. Hawxhurst

Depth of well – 585 feet
Daily pumping capacity – 420,000 gallons

Well #9-3 (1986)
Commissioners
Nicholas J. Brigandi, Chairman
Stanford Weiss, Treasurer
Gilbert E. Cusick, Secretary

Superintendent
Richard E. Woodwell

Depth of well – 600 feet
Daily pumping capacity – 1.486 million gallons

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Plant 10 (Barclay Street)

Well #10-1(1980)
Commissioners
Stanford Weiss, Chairman
Harry Borley, Treasurer
Gilbert E. Cusick, Secretary

Superintendent
Louis G. Detloff

Depth of well – 625 feet
Daily pumping capacity – 480,000 gallons
Note: Rehabilitated in 2003 under leadership of Commissioners Gilbert E. Cusick, Nicholas J. Brigandi and Richard A. Humann and Superintendent William E. Schuckmann.

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Plant 11 (Old Country Road)

Well #11-1 (1988)
Not in service at this time.
Commissioners
Richard A. Humann, Chairman
Gilbert E. Cusick, Treasurer
Nicholas J. Brigandi, Secretary

Superintendent
Richard E. Woodwell

Depth of well – 700 feet
Daily pumping capacity – 553,000 gallons

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Air-Stripping

This technology is used by many public water suppliers across Long Island, New York as more sophisticated testing is available and stricter testing requirements are being implemented. This proven state-of-the-art equipment is in place at five of the district’s plant sites to remove any traces of volatile organic compounds that may be present in the water that is pumped from the ground, long before it enters the public supply system.

Based on the principal of exposing a large surface area of water to air, the process is relatively simple to understand. Water is pumped to the top of a tower and then cascades downward over a large number of packing materials or small round objects that look like ping-pong balls. At the same time, filtered air is blown upward through the tower, breaking the water molecules and removing or “stripping” any contaminants in its travels.

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Backup Generators

The Hicksville Water District has equipped its plant sites with backup diesel generators to ensure the smooth operation of each facility and to keep the pumps running and the water flowing in the event of a power outage. Whether it’s a brief loss of electricity or major blackout like one that hit the northeast in August of 2003, the necessary equipment is in place to handle the incident, so the water remains available for drinking and fire fighting.

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Containment Pads

Some of the Hicksville Water District’s well sites are equipped with concrete pads with underground tanks that are required by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation at locations where chemicals are delivered. With the pads in place, in the event of an accidental spill, the material will be contained and prevented from entering the environment until it can be properly cleaned up.

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